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Teaching Online Journalism

Video served up any way you want it

Today’s Wallstrip is all about the “fourth-most-trafficked” Web site in the world — Baidu, the Chinese search engine. It’s interesting, informative, highly watchable. Anchor desker Lindsay Campbell starts off with some cuteness a la ex-Rocketboomer Amanda Congdon, but then it’s down to business.

I can imagine developing a habit of watching this kind of video. But I think it’s going to have to be delivered some other way … not requiring me to go to a Web page and open it up. Video online probably needs a jukebox model. I’m talking about something a bit more automated than iTunes video downloads. I’m thinking that when I have time to listen, and kinda watch (in a corner of my computer screen while I’m working), I’d just pop open this video thing and it would go out and get my video feeds and play the new ones for me.

There would be a Skip This button so that if Lindsay was blabbing about something less interesting to me than Baidu, I could zap forward to the next video in my queue.

Ads are a problem, of course, because I would naturally zap them too. But if you don’t allow me to zap, the whole model fails. So I don’t know what to tell you about that. Maybe I would pay for this, if the videos were really, really cheap.

Maybe you could build a jukebox that would charge me after I got to the end of the video. If I zap your video before the end, you don’t get paid. Ha! There’s a real consumer model!

I started thinking along these lines because of a post from Fred Wilson about chunking and tagging and “freeing” video. He pointed out that the folks who make Wallstrip have to manually upload it to each of the distribution platforms they release the video on — Revver, YouTube, Google, Yahoo!, AOL Uncut, vSocial, Veoh and MetaCafe.

This made me think about all the newspapers that are experimenting with video and doing nothing with it except burying it on their own Web sites. You can’t share it, you can’t find it with any kind of Web search (not even on the newspaper’s own Web site!), and often, you can’t even bookmark it.

This probably comes from that “walled garden” approach to online media that newspapers adopted back at the beginning — and are still having trouble letting go of. Video seems to be making it even more obvious that fencing stuff in (on your own little Web site) is not a viable business model in a networked information economy.

Update (Dec. 6): See Wallstrip’s Baidu report here, on Revver.

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4 Comments

  1. Howard Lindzon says:

    Hmm. What about subscribing to our itunes feed. Than you can vue them all up on your ipod and either listen and or watch?

    Not perfect but at least it has a fast forward.

    If you get any ideas, let me know.

    thanks for watching

    Howard

  2. Mindy McAdams says:

    Ideally, I could set up a jukebox that contained the names of all videos I like, or sources of videos, and I could line them up in any order, like a playlist.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Mindy! You need to get a video iPod.

    “Video online probably needs a jukebox model. I’m talking about something a bit more automated than iTunes video downloads.”

    THe video iPod is the jukebox model. How much more automated do you want than subscribe and sync. View as you work, wait, or walk.

    YOU can set up those videos as you please in iPod.

    - J R

  4. Mindy McAdams says:

    But I don’t want them in the iPod. I don’t like to sync my iPod (I only do it before I get on a plane). I spend a lot of time at the computer monitor, so THAT is where I want them!

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