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Teaching Online Journalism

Archive for the ‘design’ category

Smarter(7): A list for journalism students

National Geographic: 2013 Year in Review. Elise Hu: Tomorrow’s metric for news is action. Michael Wolff: Even the New York Times can’t resist going lowbrow with native advertising.

Code for journalism students: Presentations

In the semester now ending, I taught a course in coding for journalism students. You can see the detailed course schedule online. Here are all the PowerPoints I showed in that class. You can view them on SlideShare or download them there. Beginning jQuery – Part 1 – Part 2 Introduction to the DOM JavaScript […]

Top 10 posts this month

These are the most-viewed posts on this blog in the past 30 days: 10 examples of bespoke article design and scrolling goodness 10 Rules for Visual Storytelling Advice to journalism students: Forget grad school! Recording phone interviews: A solution that works Get started with Web coding. Part 5: How to use Git and GitHub List […]

List of requirements for a digital story designer

The job title given in the advertisement is “digital news developer.” These are the requirements: College degree Minimum of 2 years programming experience Advanced command of HTML5, CSS, JavaScript (including jQuery) Light Ruby or Python for data mining, Web scraping Comfort with data analysis Understanding of responsive design Familiarity with Final Cut Pro and Adobe […]

10 examples of bespoke article design and scrolling goodness

Have you been noticing all the pretty sliding/scrolling articles that are popping up around the Internetz? My students think they’re wonderful, and so do I. So let’s look at a roundup of some great ones. Of course we’ll begin with Snow Fall: The Avalanche at Tunnel Creek. This New York Times multimedia feature had the world journalism community […]

Get started with Web coding. Part 1: HTML and CSS

There’s been a lot of talk about journalists learning to code, and that conversation mainly centers on programming. When we say programming, we mean the use of computer programming languages, which cause things to happen. Things happen because a user — a member of the audience — touches something or adds some information. Interaction. Programming makes things happen.

I want to write a short series of posts about coding, for journalists. That includes journalism students. And yes — it includes the journalism educators too.

Today I’m starting with something we call code, but most people would agree it is not programming. The system we use to present information on Web pages begins with HTML, a markup language that structures the content of the page.

Required reading: How open source makes you better

In this blog post (Why Journalism Tools Gather Dust), Dan Schultz of The Boston Globe describes what amounts to one of the big reasons why news websites are not as successful as they could be. If you borrow code then you are more likely to be familiar with what the rest of the world is doing. […]