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Teaching Online Journalism

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What journalism students need to learn now

Is blogging still relevant to journalism? This is one of the questions Mark Briggs is considering as he begins work on the third edition of his popular textbook Journalism Next. In his blog post, he listed the following chapters: How the web works Blogging for better journalism Crowd-powered collaboration Microblogging and social media Going mobile Visual […]

Smarter(2): A list for journalism students

The Forbes digital content model and power of the long-tail. Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, and YouTube referrals up 52%+ in past year. America’s Shackled Press.

Smarter: A list for journalism students

The One Tech Buzzword Every Journalist Should Know. “We’re still babies at it”: BuzzFeed Video’s strategy … NSA Files Decoded: What the revelations mean for you.

Journalism curriculum, and the hands-in-the-air approach

It’s hard work making sure a journalism curriculum remains relevant. Here are “four essential components to the new curriculum for teaching news and communication,” according to Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute and co-author of The Elements of Journalism (2001): “Teaching of technical skills (how to use different platforms and technology). …” […]

Get started with Web coding. Part 3: The command line

My college roommate majored in computer science, and I majored in journalism. I’m not saying the journalists of the world have to become what she became — a systems analyst. But my roommate could (and still can) write standard English correctly, grammatically. She can communicate clearly. Her writing skills helped her rise in her profession. She wouldn’t know how to write a news story about a school board meeting, but in many situations in her jobs when writing was necessary, she could get that done quickly and well. It gave her an edge. It made her a better manager. It helped keep her projects on track.

For journalists in 2013, code starts to look more like that. Someone has even said: “In the digital age that we all live in, you are essentially illiterate if you can’t code.”

Get started with Web coding. Part 2: JavaScript and jQuery

I’m not willing to say every journalism student needs to learn JavaScript. But I believe strongly that journalists and educators and students need to understand how the Web works, and what must happen before you see something you can interact with — on a mobile phone or a tablet or a website.

So that’s how I’m going to start — with something simple and basic that you should understand.

When you see things that move or react to your clicking and typing in any Web-based story or feature or app, that’s probably JavaScript making it all happen. Only JavaScript. Even the control buttons on an audio player or a video player — now that Flash is far out of favor, even those little buttons are created with a combination of CSS and JavaScript.

Get started with Web coding. Part 1: HTML and CSS

There’s been a lot of talk about journalists learning to code, and that conversation mainly centers on programming. When we say programming, we mean the use of computer programming languages, which cause things to happen. Things happen because a user — a member of the audience — touches something or adds some information. Interaction. Programming makes things happen.

I want to write a short series of posts about coding, for journalists. That includes journalism students. And yes — it includes the journalism educators too.

Today I’m starting with something we call code, but most people would agree it is not programming. The system we use to present information on Web pages begins with HTML, a markup language that structures the content of the page.